“VULNERABILITY OF THE VULNERABLE: CONCEPTIONS, MISCONCEPTIONS AND SOLUTIONS TO NEUROLOGIC DISORDERS IN THE NIGERIAN CHILD”

170th

The lecture is focussed on brain disorders in Nigerian Children. It reviewed the development of the brain from conception to early childhood,
the pattern of brain disorders and emphasized the misconceptions held by society and individuals about these disorders which expose vulnerable
children to more vulnerabilities and proffered solutions on the way forward.
In the course of the lecture, the indisputable significance of the human brain as the centre of all human functions and existence was stressed.
Conversely, when there is a dysfunction in this ‘‘unfathomable computer” called the brain, the essence of being alive gets compromised in several
ways with profound consequences on the quality of life. It is thus not surprising that issues that affect the brain and by extension lead to neurologic
disorder are delicate and are deserving of attention, expertise and commitment.
The lecture extensively dwelt on actions and inaction that so often make the vulnerable child with brain disorder more vulnerable.
The erroneous home management of febrile convulsion, the lack of information on the nature and process of brain disorders in children,
the concept of chronicity, the expectation of unattainable cures, the gross lack is of appreciation of the health implications of in apparent brain disorders,
the absences of a viable school health program and environmental pollution with lead were exposed as the culprits which make the Nigerian Child with brain disorder
more vulnerable.
Attention was also drawn to significant contributions made by the author to enhance a better appreciation of brain disorders in the hope that this will improve
the quality of life in these children. Deserving of special mention is the development of a normative standard for the evaluation of ADHD, the use of human urine
in the home treatment of convulsions in children, sleep hygiene practices in Nigerian children, the pattern sleep disorders in Nigerian children with chronic brain
disorders, the prevalence and impact of primary headaches and migraine in adolescents and debunked for the first time the belief that migraine is not common
among Africans.
The lecture concluded with an emphatic plea on the need to set up specialized programmes in relevant disciplines particularly in the University of Benin to address
the untoward state of child neurology practice in Nigeria. By way of recommendations the need for a closer synergic relationship between town and gown was stressed
as well as the need for the government, teachers, parents and indeed all stakeholders to come on board to ensure the Nigerian child with a neurologic disorder is not
made more vulnerable

Faculty/Institute/Center: 
Department: 
Pediatrics
Date Of Lecture: 
Thursday, April 21, 2016
First Name: 
Gabriel
Middle Name: 
Egberue
Last Name: 
Ofovwe
Sex: 
Male